A high level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), known as “bad” cholesterol, is recognized as a major, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease.1,2     Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is caused by a build-up of cholesterol-rich plaque in the arteries.3   Over time, this plaque can lead to reduced blood flow, and a number of other heart-related problems.4   Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited cholesterol condition that leads to high levels of LDL-C at an early age.5   People with FH have a 50% chance of passing the condition on to their children.5   But despite an estimated 1 million people in the U.S. with FH, less than 1% have been diagnosed.6 

Listen to people from around the world share their
Messages From the Heart
 about living with FH.6

Please watch and share these Messages From the Heart to help raise awareness of this underdiagnosed condition6

The people

Dr. Konovalov Russia
Arjan Holland
Meral Turkey
Scott United States
Micheala Germany
Marie-Pierre France
Marta Spain
Luisa Portugal
Maya Russia
Dr. Hovingh Holland
Jean-Pol Belgium
Georgi Bulgaria
Gaby Austria
Steve England

Early diagnosis and treatment of FH can make a difference, but less than 1% of cases have been diagnosed in the U.S.6 By sharing their Messages From the Heart, each of these patients is helping to educate families about this inherited condition and the importance of early screening and diagnosis.

We’re on a mission to help them share their stories and raise awareness of FH – please join us in helping show them they are not alone.

Watch and share their "Messages From the Heart"

Cholesterol Education

Roll over the leaves below to learn more about cholesterol health in
patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and familial hypercholesterolemia,
an inherited cholesterol condition.

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is caused by a build-up of cholesterol-rich plaque in the arteries.3 Over time, this plaque can lead to reduced blood flow, and a number of other heart-related problems, including heart attack and stroke.4
People who have FH have high levels of LDL-C because they cannot remove bad cholesterol from the blood stream properly via the liver.5
People with heterozygous FH (HeFH) have one altered copy of a cholesterol-regulating gene. In general, people with HeFH have LDL-C levels twice as high as normal (e.g., greater than 190 mg/dL).5,8
Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an inherited condition that leads to high levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), or “bad” cholesterol, at an early age.5
There are two types of FH – heterozygous FH (HeFH) and homozygous FH (HoFH).6
The cause of atherosclerosis, which leads to ASCVD, is not known; however, certain traits, conditions or habits may raise the risk for the disease. Certain risk factors, including physical activity and smoking, can be controlled, while others like age and family history of heart disease cannot.4
People with FH have a 50% chance of passing the condition on to their children.5 But despite an estimated 1 million people in the U.S. with FH, less than 1% have been diagnosed.6
People with homozygous FH (HoFH), which is a much more severe form of hypercholesterolemia, have untreated LDL-C levels more than six times as high as normal (e.g., 500-1,000 mg/dL).5,8
Heterozygous FH (HeFH) is the more common type of FH and occurs globally in approximately one in 200 to 500 people.5,6,7
Elevated LDL-C is recognized as a major, modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD).1,2
There are approximately 11 million Americans with ASCVD and/or FH, who have uncontrolled levels of LDL-C over 70 mg/dL, despite treatment with statins and/or other cholesterol-lowering therapies. 9,10
Many people with FH are unaware that they have ASCVD until they experience a medical emergency, such as a heart attack or stroke.7

Learn more about FH in this short whiteboard animation video.

Learn more about ASCVD and FH in the U.S. in this downloadable infographic.

Watch and share these “Messages From the Heart

Family Heart Health Conversations

Mealtime is a great opportunity to learn about your family’s heart health history.
Use the below tools to help initiate these conversations at the dinner table!

Click to Download Heart Health Conversation Starters and Dinner Table Placemat

Resources

Share the Message

Creating a Family of Support for People with FH

Please share these Messages From the Heart to help us raise awareness of FH, an inherited condition5